podcast

046. Leading Information Democratization w/ Anthony Di Iorio

Anthony Di Iorio, co-founder of Ethereum, award-winning entrepreneur, and CEO of Decentral talks about freedom, liberty and impact on this week’s podcast.

045. Governance, Self-Sovereign Identity and Ethics in Blockchain Tech w/ Elizabeth Renieris

Elizabeth Renieris, a crypto and blockchain lawyer educated at Harvard and London School of Economics speaks about identity and data privacy in the crypto and blockchain space.

044. BEST OF SPEAKING OF CRYPTO 2018 — PART TWO

The best of the best – 2! Blockchain experts share their ideas in this second part of the Best of Speaking of Crypto 2018 podcast.

043. BEST OF SPEAKING OF CRYPTO 2018 – PART ONE

The best of the best. Blockchain experts share their ideas and their big picture thinking on what’s going on in the crypto and blockchain ecosystem.

038. 5×5 – Five Questions. Five Guest Interviews.

“Most people can’t keep showing up to anything. I think that your ability to show up and keep showing up and, and outwork, everybody else is everything. I also want to comment that I think for young people listening to this podcast in their 20s and they’re getting going, there’s this horrible pressure that I did not have that they have that you have to be part of a startup be crazy successful, have a non-profit, intern at the White House… stop it. Slow down. Do one thing well.”

– Michael Hyatt

What if I could get five of the coolest, forward-thinking, big-picture seeing, crypto dynamos together in one place and pick their brain about things that are blockchain related, and not?

I’d want to ask them about some challenges that they’ve overcome. I’d ask if someone’s new to crypto, where should they start to wrap their head around Bitcoin, blockchain and this whole new crypto world. And I’d want to know what’s most important, from their perspective — Love, Money or Influence.

Well, in this compilation podcast, I’m bringing you five different podcast guests who’ve all answered the same five questions.

 

1. If someone’s completely new to the world of cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology, what would you like them to know?
2. Looking back, what was one of the most challenging things you faced in your career and how were you able to overcome it?
3. What would you say is the most important character trait that someone who’s about to enter the workforce should possess?
4. If you could create your own city or town, what are three key elements you would want to include?
5. LOVE, MONEY, + INFLUENCE — can you rank them in order of importance and explain?

Guests:

Sandra Ro
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandraro/

CEO of the Global Blockchain Business Council
https://gbbcouncil.org/

Bruce Silcoff
https://www.linkedin.com/in/brucesilcoff/

CEO of Shyft Network
https://www.shyft.network/

Hartej Sawhney
https://www.linkedin.com/in/hartej/

Co-founder of Hosho
https://hosho.io/

Michael Hyatt
https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhyatt1/

Co-founder of Blue Cat
https://www.bluecatnetworks.com/

Bernie Moreno
https://www.linkedin.com/in/bernie-moreno-4251884/

Blockland Cleveland
https://www.blocklandcleveland.com/

037. Tokenizing Securities in Art with Richard McBeath

“When we talk about securities tokens, that you openly can talk about a financial return because you’re investing in a product or a business with the expectation of financial return. When we talk about utility tokens and utility token sales, we’re talking about purchasing tokens in order to access or use a product or service so there shouldn’t be any expectation for financial return.”

Richard_McBeathRichard McBeath, VP of Marketing for Masterworks shares his story and the innovative project he’s working on involving tokenizing securities, specifically artwork, on a blockchain.

Have you ever wondered what’s it must be like to own a Picasso or a Monet or an Andy Warhol painting? Up till now, only the wealthiest people in the world have been able to afford the kind of artworks created by the masters. But with blockchain technology taking the securities world by storm, all that’s about to change.

Masterworks is tokenizing artworks. So, if you’ve ever dreamed of owning a piece of history, a famous work of art or a painting by a worldwide renowned artist, then you can.RichardMcBeath_BlockCon2018

And as a fractional owner of a Monet, I won’t exactly be able to hang said artwork on my wall at home. I will, however, be able to access the high-end art market and invest in an asset class that’s only been available, up till now, to the ultra-wealthy.

So, what are the advantages of putting artwork on a blockchain? Richard talks to me about blockchain’s transparency being one of the attractive features. Also,  the ability to  increase market participation and mass adoption is exciting, because as high end as this market is, it’s record keeping is archaic. Ownership records are still mostly kept on paper.

Despite the fine art market being an investment choice for the uber riche, it’s been slow to change. Perhaps those with old money are not always open to new technologies.

Historically the art market is a $60 billion+ market in terms of its sales form the major action house, so there are advantages to being able to open it up to a broader market. Masterworks is applying for an SEC regulation A+ qualification in order to allow for both accredited and non-accredited investors to be able to own a piece of art in their collection.

Founder Scott Lynn is an internet entrepreneur whose businesses are valued at over a billion dollars and he has a personal knowledge of the art world, having acquired many high-end artworks for years,

Richard hails from Australia, but has also lived in England, Dubai and now Los Angeles and he talks about what it’s like to “shoot out the door with a one-way ticket”. He says fear can be a barrier but that there is a great expanse of opportunity, especially since the world is very different in various countries and communities around the world.

Masterworks
https://www.masterworks.io/

 

036. Smart Contracts and Wise Women with Alexandra Levin Kramer

“I think the Wild West of non-compliant token sales is over, thankfully. I think from a securities law perspective, it’s very exciting actually because it’ll make the capital markets more accessible. We talk a lot about financial inclusion in the blockchain industry, and I think this is actually it. With a caveat that it still has to be compliant with securities laws.”

Alexandra Levin Kramer has three degrees, which is probably a huge help since she’s working on three different enterprises in the blockchain space right now. She’s a practicing lawyer and partner at CKR law in NYC and the Founding Chair of its Blockchain Technology + Digital Currency practice group. She also co-founded Women On the Block, which hosts blockchain conferences around the world. And, she’s Co-founder of Womin.io that uses blockchain technology to enable freelancers and employers to interact peer to peer through its decentralized platform.

Women on the Block
Alexandra has been in the space for a few years now, but this past January when there was negative press about the crypto space that emphasized lambos and yachts with party girls, making it look like the blockchain world was a boys club, it bothered her. That wasn’t her experience and she thought if she, as a female had been just starting her career and had that impression, that she would have run for the hills. So she wanted to do something about it. So she co-founded Women On the Block, to welcome women into the space and promote diversity in blockchain.

Womin.io
Through learning about the power of blockchain – she even took a coding course – and realizing that it can have a huge impact, Alexandra decided to create her own blockchain startup. Womin.io uses decentralization and the ability to validate on a blockchain to put employee history verification into code that will allow easy access to an online market of employees.

Smart Contracts

One of the points she makes about smart contracts is that they are really just a starting point.

“In an actual legal agreement, you can’t cover every possible contingency and similarly in a smart contract, there are going to be things that happen that are not foreseeable under the code. That’s where other issues like governance and some degree of centralization will have to come in, but I think the potential is fantastic and I’m all for more efficiency, lower legal fees, lower legal costs. I think that’s better for everyone.”

Alexandra believes that some good use cases for smart contracts will be lease agreements, and employment and freelancer agreements.

She also talks to me about the differences between men and women. One of the things she mentions is that “women have a reticence to try new things or go out of their comfort zone.” And she also argues that there are studies that show diversity is an indicator of profitability.

What she recommends generally as that we make our own opportunities, learn something new every day. And she says she tries to live by a Jewish saying “Who is a wise person? One who learns from everyone.”

We also talk about:
• Security tokens and the SEC
• Intellectual property rights
• Smart contracts on public or private blockchain
• Lawyers and developers speaking the same language
• AI learning to automate dispute resolution

Women on the Block
https://www.womenontheblock.io/
Blockchain Conference in Singapore
Wednesday, November 14, 2018

CKR law
https://www.ckrlaw.com/locations/north-america/new-york/alexandra-kramer.html

Womin.io
http://womin.io

Made it to Top 25 of Richard Branson’s Extreme Tech Challenge competition.
http://www.extremetechchallenge.com/2018/10/24/xtc-2019-top-25-announcement/

035. Thinking Differently + Tokenizing a Digital Encyclopedia with Everipedia Co-Founder Sam Kazemian

“I think that this space, particularly Blockchain generates a lot of actual prosperity by bringing markets to things that weren’t possible before. We’re building an encyclopedia that’s not owned by anyone… other people have a stake in collectively owning the governance and the profit and the value that’s generated out of this and before blockchain that literally wasn’t possible.”

Sam Kazemian is one of the co-founders of Everipedia, which is basically like Wikipedia, decentralized. Wikipedia, like most things on the internet, is becoming outdated because people like Sam are recognizing that there’s way more value to the internet than what we’ve been accessing up till now. So Everipedia is tokenizing the value of their encyclopedia of information. IQ tokens are earned by anyone who wants to generate or curate the information on this new monetized digital encyclopedia.

Why not be paid for creating content, approving edits or for selling services on the network?

It’s the Proof of Stake model. When someone wants to use the site, they stake tokens. If they do good work then they earn IQ tokens that are printed, (in the same way that Bitcoin miners earn Bitcoin). The idea behind the staking tokens is that if more and more people are joining the network, more invest in the system and remove the tokens from use, which means there’s less liquidity, so the price should increase.

Everipedia did an airdrop of about $50 million worth of IQ tokens to EOS holders. They chose to give away tokens to help incentivize more users and build the community. They chose not to do an ICO because they received $30 million of funding from Block.one.

One of the most interesting things that I learned from talking to Sam was how he got his start in Bitcoin. From mining in college housing to trading and looking at all sides of blockchain technology. Sam didn’t come from a developer background. He studied philosophy and neuroscience at UCLA and it was those philosophy courses that really helped him to think differently.

So how important is thinking differently? Isn’t it the only way to do something that’s never been done before?

We get into the ideas of reasoning in philosophy and the philosophy of blockchain technology and how he’s created something that’s never been done before.

Other topics:

• Sam believes stable coins are what people should be watching out for
• The most challenging time in the life of a startup is not the beginning, it’s when it comes time to buckle down and do the work with no spotlight
• ETH and EOS and their supporters can be friends
• Having a constrained view is a barrier to growth
• Doing something completely different can lead to changing the world

Sam Kazemian
Twitter: @samkazemian

Everipedia
https://everipedia.org

Telegram
https://t.me/everipedia

Airdrops
https://airdrops.io/everipedia/